Record US holiday spending on gadgets: CEA

Oct 19, 2010
Pedestrians and shoppers pass along Fifth Avenue in New York City in 2009. Americans will spend a record amount on consumer electronics this holiday season, devoting nearly a third of their gift budget to gadgets, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) said Tuesday.

Americans will spend a record amount on consumer electronics this holiday season, devoting nearly a third of their gift budget to gadgets, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) said Tuesday.

"This holiday season, spending on consumer electronics gifts will reach historic highs, despite an overall decline in gift spending," the CEA said in its annual survey of holiday spending.

"Overall, will spend 750 dollars on holiday gifts, down two percent from last year," it said. "They will, however, spend more on consumer electronics gifts than ever before.

"Consumers will spend 232 dollars on gifts, up five percent from last year and the highest level since CEA began tracking holiday spending," the CEA said.

Among the most-wanted gifts for the holidays are computers, Apple's iPad, electronic readers, digital cameras, televisions and video games systems, the CEA said.

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