German auto sector voices concern over rare-earth spat

Oct 25, 2010
Matthias Wissmann, president of the VDA federation of the German automotive industry, gives a speech during the federation's annual press conference in 2008. German industrialists are concerned over supplies of rare earth minerals needed for a wide variety of products after companies said access to the raw materials was restricted by China.

German industrialists are concerned over supplies of rare earth minerals needed for a wide variety of products after companies said access to the raw materials was restricted by China.

"Supply difficulties or sharp price increases for these metals affect the competitive position of our companies," the head of the German auto federation VDA, Matthias Wissmann, told AFP on Monday.

"That is why we need a strong committment by political leaders in charge of the question to be assured of the raw material's availability," he added.

Klaus Mittelbach of the ZVEI federation of electronic industries said that "development of the market has become critical as a result of restrictions of Chinese exports."

Germany adopted measures last week to ensure industrial groups would have access to such materials, around 97 percent of which are now produced by China.

Two thirds of the global reserves of rare earth elements, used to make cars, computers and flat-screen televisions, are located outside China however.

The world's leading auto parts group Bosch, which uses some of the elements to make electric motors, said it was "vital to continue to secure the availability" for the next decade.

"It is thus necessary to tap unexploited reserves" outside China, a Bosch spokesman told AFP, especially as companies seek to develop electric cars.

"If the move toward electromobility is not to be delayed, this means investments now," he said.

A spokesman for Europe's biggest auto manufacturer, Volkswagen, said it "is watching rare earth markets and trends carefully to be able to react as early as possible if need be."

"If there were to be a shortage for geopolitical reasons, we see ways to compensate in the form of new mining projects in Australia or Vietnam," the VW spokesman added.

The father of Chinese economic reforms, Deng Xiaoping, once compared China's rare earths to the Middle East's oil, and critics increasingly accuse Beijing of emulating the 12-member OPEC cartel.

China has cut rare earth exports by five to 10 percent a year since 2006 as demand and prices soar.

VW uses limited quantities of such materials now but they "constitute a basic element for certain technologies in hybrid or electric cars," the spokesman said.

He pointed to Neodymium, which is used to make electric motors.

Other rare earth elements like Europium, Lanthanum, Samarium, Scandium and Yttrium are used to make TV screens, mobile phones, fibre obtics, X-ray machines, lasers and mercury-vapour lamps.

Explore further: Pollution top concern for U.S. and Canadian citizens around Great Lakes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

China denies cartel-like behaviour on rare earths

Oct 19, 2010

A senior Chinese trade official on Tuesday denied the country was dictating prices of rare earth metals to the world and insisted shipments of the minerals to Japan were never blocked.

Taiwan, China may develop electric cars together

Nov 16, 2009

Taiwan and China are looking into developing electric cars together and will hold a conference here next week to seek areas where they can cooperate, a Taipei official said Monday.

Traders: China resumes rare earth exports to Japan

Sep 29, 2010

(AP) -- Beijing has apparently told Chinese companies they can resume exports to Japan of rare earth minerals used in high-tech products but is holding up shipments with tighter customs inspections, two Japanese trading ...

Traders: China halts rare earth exports to Japan

Sep 24, 2010

(AP) -- China has halted exports to Japan of rare earth elements - which are crucial for advanced manufacturing - trading company officials said Friday amid tensions between the rival Asian powers over a territorial dispute.

Recommended for you

Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US

Apr 17, 2014

The White House Thursday announced a series of measures aimed at increasing solar energy production in the United States, particularly by encouraging the installation of solar panels in public spaces.

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

Apr 17, 2014

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

david_42
5 / 5 (1) Oct 25, 2010
Simply a matter of the prices rising enough for other mines to get back into production. With a five year warning, you might think some would have done so, or at least made plans. But, unless the crisis hits this fiscal quarter, most companies couldn't care less.
sstritt
5 / 5 (1) Oct 25, 2010
But, unless the crisis hits this fiscal quarter, most companies couldn't care less.

The west thinks a quarter ahead- China thinks a century ahead. We better wake up!

More news stories

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...

Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'

For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look "whiter than white," but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different ...

Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years

(Phys.org) —Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth. Scientists ...

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...