Father and son send iPhone and HD camera into stratosphere (w/ Video)

Oct 19, 2010 by Lin Edwards report

(PhysOrg.com) -- A father and young son from New York have succeeded in sending an HD camera and iPhone 19 miles high into the upper stratosphere and recording the flight.

Luke Geissbühler and son Max, 7, attached the camera and to a weather balloon, believing it would rise until it was high enough that the lack of atmosphere would burst the balloon and it would fall back to Earth. The balloon was required to survive glacial temperatures, high winds, and a possible splashdown in water. Since it was expected to rise above 30-40,000 feet, the cruising altitude of commercial aircraft, the balloon also had to pass the weather balloon standards set by the Federal Aviation Administration.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

They did some low-altitude testing and then took their balloon to a park in Newburgh, New York, where they launched it with the equipment in a small capsule tethered to the balloon. The camera and iPhone were protected from sub-zero temperatures by chemical hand-warming packets. They chose Newburgh as their launching site because it was is a relatively sparsely populated area, and because it has a party store that sells helium.

The material used to make the capsule was simply a disposable takeout food container with spray-on insulation applied to the interior. The iPhone (borrowed from a friend) was loaded with InstaMapper, a free GPS tracking application that allowed the phone to act as a beacon for retrieving the balloon.

The balloon climbed at 25 feet per second, and after about 70 minutes it reached about 100,000 feet, where it burst and then descended on a small parachute, landing safely 30 miles away from the launch site. The Geissbühlers spent the evening and night searching for the balloon, and the iPhone’s GPS eventually guided them to it atop a large tree. The camera was able to record 100 minutes of footage. A short video made by the father and son team has become a viral hit on Vimeo, a video-sharing website, where it has received over a million views.

Luke Geissbühler is a director and cinematographer, and had been involved in research on enthusiasts for a feature film. He decided to do the project at the request of his son, who had been lobbying for a homemade spacecraft. He explained that his son asks for the impossible, and after explaining why it is impossible, he then begins to question and investigate whether it really is impossible.

Mr Geissbühler completed the project with assistance from his brother Phillip, a Boston-based physicist, who helped them work out how to cope with issues such as high winds, low temperatures, and how to predict the balloon’s behavior.

Explore further: Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

More information: www.brooklynspaceprogram.org/BSP/Home.html

Related Stories

Giant NASA balloon crashes in Australia

Apr 29, 2010

A giant NASA science balloon crashed during take-off in Australia Thursday, destroying its multi-million-dollar payload, toppling a large car and narrowly missing frightened observers.

Optical imaging technique for angioplasty

Aug 10, 2010

A new optical imaging technique described in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments, which is published by the American Institute of Physics, holds the potential to greatly improve angioplasty, a surg ...

Students Launch Cockroaches and Cameras Into Space

Mar 12, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A group of cockroaches recently took a ride on a high-altitude balloon launched into space by freshmen aerospace engineering students from the University of California, San Diego. The cockroaches ...

New Balloon Successfully Flight-Tested Over Antarctica

Jan 09, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- NASA and the National Science Foundation have successfully launched and demonstrated a newly designed super pressure balloon prototype that may enable a new era of high-altitude scientific ...

Recommended for you

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

14 hours ago

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

16 hours ago

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

Apr 23, 2014

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

JamesThomas
5 / 5 (3) Oct 19, 2010
Congratulations on an extraordinary success!
fgordon
5 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2010
Marvelous!
ForFreeMinds
2.6 / 5 (5) Oct 19, 2010
I'd like to add my congratulations - this is the kind of thing the military did 50 years ago, though at a much higher cost.
Bob_Kob
5 / 5 (1) Oct 20, 2010
All that wasted helium...

More news stories

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

Professional and amateur astronomers join forces

(Phys.org) —Long before the term "citizen science" was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours ...

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...