Number of diabetic Americans could triple by 2050

October 22, 2010 By MIKE STOBBE , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Federal officials estimate that as many as 1 in 3 U.S. adults could have diabetes by the year 2050.

The says that 1 in 10 have diabetes now. But the number could expand dramatically in the next 40 years if current trends continue.

Nearly a decade ago, CDC researchers estimated that as many as 39 million Americans could have diabetes by the mid-century mark. Now they say it could be in the range of 76 million to 100 million.

The revised figures include better accounting for people who have but are undiagnosed. Also, they used new population growth estimates for the elderly and minorities, who have higher rates of .

Explore further: Study finds coffee may cut diabetes risk

More information: CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/

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