Canadian leads publishing of first results from Large Hadron Collider

Oct 12, 2010

Researchers used Einstein's famous E=mc2 equation and the Large Hadron Collider to recreate a miniature version of the event at the origins of our Universe, and the first findings from their work were published in the journal Physical Review Letters. Dr. Andreas Warburton of McGill's Department of Physics made leading contributions to the analysis of data from the experiment, known as "ATLAS," meaning the findings have a special significance for Canadian science.

Warburton and 3171 colleagues from around the world are using the data collected from the recreation in an attempt to look for exotic new particles whose existence is suggested by . His work may help to revolutionize our understanding of the fundamental components of the Universe.

"Understanding whether new kinds of matter exist or not is interesting because it holds clues to knowledge about how the Universe works fundamentally," Warburton said. "The Standard Model of Particle Physics is a useful but it is known to be flawed and incomplete – we are searching for new particles that lie outside this framework, and we are also seeking to establish the non-existence of these hypothetical ." The research published this week falls into the latter category and is about determining the mass of a theoretical particle known as an "excited quark."

Warburton offered the following analogy: "By exploring the high-energy subatomic frontier, it is metaphorically somewhat like turning over stones at the seashore and looking for new and interesting surprises hiding under the rocks. Here we are looking under stones that have been too heavy to lift before this summer. What we see or don't see under those stones helps to paint new pictures about how the Universe works and tells us which stones are most important to look under next."

"The results reported in our paper have been awaited for a long time and by many people," Warburton said. "There was friendly competition amongst us as to who will be the first to make a publishable measurement that either excludes or discovers New Physics, and I am proud that the ATLAS team won this race. I feel fortunate and privileged to have played a leading role in getting the analysis into a publishable form in a very short time." Warburton has since returned from Geneva to Montreal and his office at McGill University.

Explore further: New study refines biological evolution model

More information: G. Aad et al. Search for New Particles in Two-Jet Final States in 7 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC. Physical Review Letters, 2010; 105 (16) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.161801

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

High-energy physics at the highest level

Mar 27, 2006

It will be the most powerful particle collider on the planet. And Iowa State University physicists will be right there working with it. The European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland, is ...

Michigan integral to world's largest physics experiment

Sep 05, 2008

After 20 years of construction, a machine that could either verify or nullify the prevailing theory of particle physics is about to begin its mission. CERN's epic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project currently involves 25 ...

Is the Vacuum Empty? -- the Higgs Field and the Dark Energy

May 10, 2007

The problems in understanding the true nature of the “vacuum” of space were discussed by theoretical physicist Alvaro de Rújula from CERN (the European Council for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, Switzerland, and a professor ...

Hunt for Higgs boson: Mass of top quark narrows search

Dec 07, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- New high-energy particle research by a team working with data from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory further heightens the uncertainty about the exact nature of a key theoretical component ...

Recommended for you

New study refines biological evolution model

19 hours ago

Models for the evolution of life are now being developed to try and clarify the long term dynamics of an evolving system of species. Specifically, a recent model proposed by Petri Kärenlampi from the University ...

Production phase for LSST camera sensors nears

20 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A single sensor for the world's largest digital camera detected light making its way through wind, air turbulence, and Earth's atmosphere, successfully converting the light into a glimpse of ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Eric_B
5 / 5 (2) Oct 12, 2010
uh, ok, what did the publication say that was interesting? did i miss something or did they just proudly announce the functionality of their laser-printer?
Auxon
5 / 5 (1) Oct 13, 2010
It's basically just a McGill press release saying they did stuff that was a "big deal", but obviously not big enough of a deal to actually release information about what the analysis actually reveals. Apparently nothing interesting.
wraillantclark
5 / 5 (1) Oct 13, 2010
McGill University attempts to write press releases in a way that engages the general public. It can be difficult to balance scientific detail with the average level of scientific literacy.

In this instance, researchers have contributed to determining the mass of excited quarks. The Journal article (attached) offers detailed information regarding the findings, but should you have any particular questions, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Thank you for your interest,

William Raillant-Clark

William Raillant-Clark
Communications Officer - Scientific Research, Media Relations
Agent de communications - Recherche scientifique, Service des relations avec les médias
McGill University - Université McGill
MONTRÉAL
william.raillant-clark@mcgill.ca
514-398-2189 (office/bureau)
http://www.linked...antclark