Japan rapid scanning system can digitise book in one minute (w/ Video)

September 10, 2010
This handout picture, released Thursday from University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, shows a prototype ultra-speed scanner capable of digitising a book in one minute, develped by professor Masatoshi Ishikawa of the Tokyo University.

Japanese researchers said Friday they had developed technology to scan a book as fast as a person can flip through it.

A prototype ultra-speed scanner capable of digitising a book in one minute will be built within two years, said the chief researcher of the team at the University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Information Science and Technology.

The "book-flipping scanning" system works with a camera that can take up to 500 photographs per second, enabling it to record about 170 book pages in 60 seconds as a person thumbs through them.

The system adjusts for the distortion caused by the curvature of the moving pages by measuring their three-dimensional forms using infra-red beams, so that the images can be electronically "flattened" to look like the original.

"We believe this is the world's fastest (scanning) system as far as the technologies already published are concerned," said Yoshihiro Watanabe, who leads the research team.

"We are considering using robots to turn the pages automatically and more neatly," he told AFP by telephone.

The university researchers teamed up with Japan's Dai Nippon Printing this month to put the technology to practical use, with the aim of building a prototype scanner within two years.

Japanese printing firms are diversifying into e-books, which can be read using handheld devices such as Apple's or Amazon's Kindle.

Watanabe said the technology to rapidly capture 3-D images of fast-moving objects could be used in a variety of applications from robotics to industrial and automotive design.

The video will load shortly

The technology could be used for quality control of industrial products, he said. "You would just scan products that come out of manufacturing lines," he added.

"It could also be used to develop a safer and more comfortable driving system. If mounted on a car, this could take 3-D images of obstacles ahead or dents and bumps in the road to avoid them.

"If loaded into the eyes of robots, they would be able to move much faster than humans."

Explore further: Scanner scans a 200 page book in one minute (w/ Video)

More information: See PhysOrg's earlier report: Scanner scans a 200 page book in one minute

Related Stories

Xerox Updates DocuMate Scanner

May 2, 2007

Xerox has updated its DocuMate 152 duplex scanner with integrated Visioneer OneTouch scanning and Kofax Virtual ReScan technology, providing enhanced images and other improved scanning capabilities, the company says.

Japan develops 'touchable' 3D TV technology

August 26, 2010

A Japanese research team said Thursday it had developed the world's first 3D television system that allows users to touch, pinch or poke images floating in front of them.

Amazon releasing Kindle software for Android

May 18, 2010

(AP) -- Amazon.com Inc. is hoping to snag even more customers for the electronic books it sells by releasing a version of its Kindle e-reader software for phones that use Google Inc.'s increasingly popular Android operating ...

Travel book goes mobile with scannable QR code

October 27, 2009

(AP) -- Many travelers still rely on comprehensive printed guidebooks for tourism information. But travelers are also increasingly using mobile technology to plan a trip or find their way around.

Recommended for you

Making it easier to collaborate on code

October 26, 2016

Git is an open-source system with a polarizing reputation among programmers. It's a powerful tool to help developers track changes to code, but many view it as prohibitively difficult to use.

Dutch unveil giant vacuum to clean outside air

October 25, 2016

Dutch inventors Tuesday unveiled what they called the world's first giant outside air vacuum cleaner—a large purifying system intended to filter out toxic tiny particles from the atmosphere surrounding the machine.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

5 / 5 (1) Sep 10, 2010
More information: See PhysOrg's earlier report: Scanner scans a 200 page book in one minute

Isn't this just that same technology re-reported except with 'we may get a robot to flip the pages' tacked on to the end?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.