Hundreds of New Views from Telescope Orbiting Mars

August 4, 2010
At the center of this view of an area of mid-latitude northern Mars, a fresh crater about 6 meters (20 feet) in diameter holds an exposure of bright material, blue in this false-color image. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

(PhysOrg.com) -- The most powerful telescopic camera ever to orbit Mars reveals a fresh crater, an ice mound, climate-recording layers and many other views in 314 newly released observations.

The latest set of new images from the telescopic High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter offers detailed views of diverse Martian landscapes.

Features as small as desks are revealed in the 314 observations made between June 6 and July 7, 2010, now available on the camera team's site and NASA's Planetary Data System.

The camera is one of six instruments on NASA's , which reached Mars in 2006.

Explore further: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Status

More information: For more information about the mission, see mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/

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