US demands WikiLeaks return military documents

August 5, 2010
The homepage of the WikiLeaks.org website is seen on a computer after leaked classified military documents were posted to in July, 2010. The Pentagon on Thursday demanded that the whistleblower website "return immediately" leaked US military documents after the site released tens of thousands of secret files.

The Pentagon on Thursday demanded that the whistleblower website WikiLeaks "return immediately" leaked US military documents after the site released tens of thousands of secret files.

"The Defense Department demands that Wikileaks return immediately to the all versions of documents obtained directly or indirectly from the Department of Defense databases or records," said Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell.

The website's disclosure "of a large number of our documents has already threatened the safety of our troops, our allies and Afghan citizens who are working with us to help bring about peace and stability in that part of the world," he said.

"The only acceptable course is for to take steps immediately to return all versions of all of these documents to the US government and permanently delete them from its website, computers and records."

Explore further: WikiLeaks shuts due to lack of funds, hopes to be back soon

Related Stories

US soldier arrested in WikiLeaks case

June 7, 2010

A US soldier in Iraq has been arrested for allegedly leaking classified information to whistleblower website WikiLeaks, including video of a helicopter strike in Baghdad and US diplomatic cables.

Recommended for you

Smart home heating and cooling

August 28, 2015

Smart temperature-control devices—such as thermostats that learn and adjust to pre-programmed temperatures—are poised to increase comfort and save energy in homes.

Smallest 3-D camera offers brain surgery innovation

August 28, 2015

To operate on the brain, doctors need to see fine details on a small scale. A tiny camera that could produce 3-D images from inside the brain would help surgeons see more intricacies of the tissue they are handling and lead ...

Team creates functional ultrathin solar cells

August 27, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Johannes Kepler University Linz in Austria has developed an ultrathin solar cell for use in lightweight and flexible applications. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, ...

Interactive tool lifts veil on the cost of nuclear energy

August 24, 2015

Despite the ever-changing landscape of energy economics, subject to the influence of new technologies and geopolitics, a new tool promises to root discussions about the cost of nuclear energy in hard evidence rather than ...

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

fmfbrestel
5 / 5 (1) Aug 05, 2010
Um, freedom of the press? The leaker violated federal law, Wikileaks broke no law. So they intentionally have no way to identify their sources, is that against the law? If you actually visit the site, you will see leaked CIA documents discussing the need to "destroy" wikileaks. Could you imagine the outrage if the US government was caught contemplating the 'destruction' of the New York Times or Washington Post?
fmfbrestel
not rated yet Aug 05, 2010
If wikileaks can get their hands on such dangerous documents can you imagine what a determined foreign agency could get? Maybe the pentagon should be more concerned about their internal security then trying to shake down the media.
TabulaMentis
not rated yet Aug 05, 2010
I wonder if the FBI is willing to return the video of the young girls undressing?

Link:
http://www.breitb...97MF9I00

The future looks quite dim until people are able get their perverted spying habits under control.
TabulaMentis
not rated yet Aug 06, 2010
Um, freedom of the press? The leaker violated federal law, Wikileaks broke no law. So they intentionally have no way to identify their sources, is that against the law? If you actually visit the site, you will see leaked CIA documents discussing the need to "destroy" wikileaks. Could you imagine the outrage if the US government was caught contemplating the 'destruction' of the New York Times or Washington Post?

Do you not think a confidential global court of some kind would be a better place to expose leaked documents instead of posting them unanimously on a Web site for all to see? Privacy is an issue that should be taken more seriously!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.