Bees warm up with a drink, too

Aug 18, 2010

When we venture out on a cool morning, nothing energises our body like a nice warm drink and new research reveals that bees also use the same idea when they're feeling cold.

A study by insect scientists Drs Melanie Norgate and Adrian Dyer shows that bees also like to keep winter at bay with a warm drink.

The Monash University research, published in the prestigious journal PLoS One, has shown that important of many of our flowers, native Australian stingless bees, warm up their bodies by having a 'hot' drink on a cool day - or a 'cool' drink in warmer weather.

Working with collaborators from Monash University and the CSIRO, the researchers showed that at a range of ambient temperatures (23-30°C) bees displayed a significant preference for feeding from artificial flowers that presented nectar-like solution that was warmer than the ambient temperature.

"The bees perceived warmth as an important reward in addition to the nutritious that they collect from flowers. However, surprisingly for the research team, when the reached 34°C, the bees began preferring a cooler feeder," Dr Dyer said.

"The study showed that just as a person might choose which type of drink to have depending on the weather, the bees also made a decision on their drink, based on what flowers might offer nectar at the ideal temperature for the particular climatic conditions."

The researchers then measured the body temperature of bees after they had ingested warm liquid nectar.

"The bees' preference for warm liquid was then examined by using special infrared cameras that recorded the body temperature of bees whilst resting, flying, or drinking nectar of different temperatures. The thermal images revealed an interesting pattern as the warm nectar helped bees maintain a body temperature (30-34°C) that is likely to be required by insects to maintain active flight," Dr Dyer.

"Choosing nectar of various temperatures appears to be a novel behavioural mechanism bees use to maintain the most suitable body temperature for flight," Dr Norgate said.

Future work will concentrate on understanding what flower features enable plants to modulate the temperature of their flowers to present rewards to pollinating insects, and how this may be important for the distribution of flowers in different regions where like temperature are variable or changing.

Explore further: Can we easily distinguish male and female protoceratops?

Related Stories

The cost of long tongues

Apr 16, 2007

Orchid bees use their extraordinarily long tongues to drink nectar from the deep, tropical flowers only they can access. Researchers have long suspected that this kind of exclusive access came with a mechanical ...

Are bees also addicted to caffeine and nicotine?

Feb 10, 2010

A study carried out at the University of Haifa has found that bees prefer nectar with a small concentration of caffeine and nicotine over nectar that does not comprise these substances at all. "This could ...

Recommended for you

Barking characterizes dogs as voice characterizes people

1 hour ago

An international group of researchers has conducted a study on canine behavior showing that gender, age, context and individual recognition can be identified with a high percentage of success through statistical ...

Bird beaks feeling the heat of climate change, say scientists

3 hours ago

While the human population grapples with ways to counter the effects of climate change, Deakin University research has discovered that birds might have been working on their own solution for the past 145 years – grow bigger ...

How longhorned beetles find Mr. Right

15 hours ago

A longhorned beetle's sexy scent might make a female perk up her antennae. But when the males of several species all smell the same, a female cannot choose by cologne alone.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.