US judge bars growing of genetically modified beets

August 16, 2010

A US judge has ordered a ban on growing genetically modified beets in the United States until the Department of Agriculture fully investigates their environmental impact.

Judge Jeffrey White of the federal court in San Francisco, California, made the ruling on Friday. It bars new cultivation of the genetically modified beets, which represent 90 percent of the US crop.

Beets are the source of half of US sugar production; the rest is from sugar cane.

Experts think the evaluation that was requested will take more than two years. Some fear that could lead to shortages, and growers warn there may not be enough of the traditional unmodified seed.

The judge ruled at the request of activists, including the Center for Food Safety, and the Sierra Club, which oppose genetically modified .

The US sugar beet crop was worth 1.33 billion dollars in 2007-2008.

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gunslingor1
not rated yet Aug 16, 2010
Currently, they aren't even required to test if a genetically modified crop kills people. Only immediate effects are even considered, since they are easily proven in court. Long term or culmulative effects are not their concern, the law doesn't even mention it (thanks agricultural lobbiests!).

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