Scott & White Healthcare study aimed at T-cell lymphoma

Jul 15, 2010

Scott & White's Cancer Research Institute (CRI) is conducting a clinical trial that targets malignant T-cell lymphoma, a type of blood cancer.

Lymphoma, which affects the white blood cells that normally protect against illness, is categorized either as B-cell or T-cell. About 85% of lymphomas are of B-cell origin, and 15% of T-cell origin. T-cell lymphomas are primarily chronic, but they do not respond well to chemotherapy.

Therefore, says Arthur E. Frankel, M.D., director of the Research Institute and director of Scott & White's Division of hematology/oncology, the need exists to find new agents that can selectively target and kill the malignant T-cells. The research agent under study at Scott & White contains diphtheria targeting malignant T-cells.

"This new targeted protein agent is designed to eliminate tumor cells resistant to chemotherapy," said Dr. Frankel. "The short course of treatment may improve quality of life if successful."

To date, 10 people have enrolled in the clinical trial. Scott & White's CRI will enroll up to 40 subjects to participate in this clinical trial to determine the safest doses for treatment of T-cell . Eligible subjects for the study must have failed previous treatment options.

T-cell malignant diseases include MF/Sezary Syndrome, T-cell LGL, PTCL, T-cell CLL, T-cell NHL, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma, nasal extranodal T-cell lymphoma, enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma.

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