Launch delayed for satellite to watch space debris

July 6, 2010

(AP) -- The launch of a new U.S. Air Force space surveillance satellite has been delayed due to a software problem in a rocket similar to the one that will lift the satellite into orbit.

The Space-Based Space Surveillance was scheduled to lift off Thursday from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. No new launch date has been set.

Air Force officials said Tuesday that tests revealed a software problem on another Minotaur IV rocket. No other details have been released.

The satellite is designed to give the Air Force its first full-time, space-based surveillance of satellites and debris in Earth orbit.

The Air Force monitors about 1,000 active satellites and 20,000 pieces of debris for possible collisions.

Explore further: First Modernized GPS Satellite Built By Lockheed Martin Launched

0 shares

Related Stories

Air Force rocket to launch NASA satellite

December 6, 2006

NASA says its GeneSat-1 spacecraft will be carrying bacteria inside a miniature laboratory when it's launched into orbit Monday by a U.S. Air Force rocket.

Air Force: winged robotic spacecraft launched

April 23, 2010

(AP) -- An unmanned Air Force space plane resembling a small space shuttle has been launched on its maiden voyage into orbit, carried aloft aboard an Atlas 5 rocket Thursday evening, the service announced.

New US satellite to monitor debris in Earth orbit

July 3, 2010

(AP) -- A new U.S. Air Force satellite will provide the first full-time, space-based surveillance of hundreds of satellites and thousands of pieces of debris that could crash into American and allied assets circling the ...

Recommended for you

Dense star clusters shown to be binary black hole factories

July 29, 2015

The coalescence of two black holes—a very violent and exotic event—is one of the most sought-after observations of modern astronomy. But, as these mergers emit no light of any kind, finding such elusive events has been ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.