Rare dark jellyfish showing up in San Diego Bay

July 14, 2010

(AP) -- Scientists say a rare species of dark purple jellyfish is showing up in San Diego Bay and washing ashore on beaches.

Dr. Nigella Hillgarth of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography said Tuesday the Birch Aquarium has four of the jellies for display.

Hillgarth says the black sea nettle has turned up in coastal waters more frequently in recent years. Oceanographers don't know why, but think it may be due to warmer oceans or changes in the populations the eat.

The black sea nettle can grow up to 3 feet across with 30-foot-long tentacles.

Hillgarth says they sting, so boaters and beachgoers should admire them without touching.

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not rated yet Jul 14, 2010
A meter across? That would be quite a sight, I tell you what.

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