'Paul the Octopus' now an iPhone app

July 14, 2010
An octopus named Paul swims past a football in his aquarium on July 9, at the Sea Life aquarium in Oberhausen, western Germany. Paul, the psychic octopus who predicted World Cup matches with uncanny accuracy, is now an iPhone application.

Paul, the psychic octopus who predicted World Cup matches with uncanny accuracy, is now an iPhone application.

The Brazilian software developer behind the program, uTouchLabs, describes it as a "fun way to randomly choose between two options."

"Cinema or theatre? Pizza or sushi? Skirt of dress? Marcia or Andrea? Ask the ?" it says.

The user types in the options and a cartoon octopus chooses between them.

The program costs 99 cents to download from Apple's .

Paul, an octopus at an aquarium in Oberhausen, Germany, earned worldwide attention during the World Cup with his predictions, which included Spain's victory in the final against the Netherlands.

Explore further: Statistically 'Proven'! Germany Will Be Next Soccer World Champion

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