FDA approves larger dose of Pfizer's Aricept

July 25, 2010

(AP) -- Drugmakers Eisai Inc. and Pfizer Inc. said on Saturday that government regulators have given them permission to make a larger dose of its Alzheimer's disease drug Aricept for patients who have already been taking the smaller dose.

Aricept is the version of the drug donepezil, and is co-marketed by Eisai, of Japan, and Pfizer. Its 2009 revenue for was $432 million, with another $3.3 billion for Eisai, making it the largest seller out of four drugs that can temporarily reduce Alzheimer's symptoms.

The companies said the higher dose improved scores on a patient test that measures cognition. There was no difference on a different test that measures global function.

Approval by the followed a study of 1,467 patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's. It said the larger dose is recommended for patients who are already taking smaller doses daily for at least three months.

Explore further: Pfizer heart pill to be standalone therapy

0 shares

Related Stories

Pfizer drug found with serious side effect

November 1, 2006

U.S. pharmaceutical company Pfizer Inc. says clinical trials of its heart medication torcetrapib suggest the drug has a potentially serious side effect.

Pfizer gets EU approval for kids' cholesterol drug

July 6, 2010

(AP) -- The European Union has approved a new chewable form of cholesterol blockbuster Lipitor for children 10 and up with high levels of bad cholesterol and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, Pfizer said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.