CSIRO grants global license for new polymer technology

July 6, 2010

CSIRO has signed a global licensing agreement for its patented RAFT technology. Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (or RAFT) technology is an elegant and powerful polymerisation process that has given rise to a new branch of polymer chemistry.

RAFT enables the development of very complex molecules that can be used for a wide range of products. The technology is already generating major improvements in the areas of coatings and paints, electroactive materials, fuel additives, biomaterials, synthesis, personal care, agents and car components.

About 3200 papers have been published on RAFT developments, coupled with over 200 patents granted to research and commercial institutions globally.

Polymer, a US company which specialises in manufacturing specialty monomers and sophisticated polymers has agreed to market the technology worldwide.

Monomer-Polymer and Dajac Labs CEO Stephen Bell said having access to RAFT technology will allow the company to “undertake controlled radical polymerizations and consequently, create additional success and opportunity in material development”.

Additionally, Monomer-Polymer said that the would enable the company to strengthen their position as a key player in the synthesis, development and scale-up of specialty monomers and resulting polymer systems. A unique aspect of Monomer-Polymer’s chemistries is the internal expertise with organosilanes which should open up unique uses of RAFT to create polymers with organosilicon functionalities in the architecture.

“This new technology is creating global impact and has been licensed by a wide range of Australian and multinational companies,” CSIRO’s Business Development Manager for RAFT Kate Dawson said.

Monomer-Polymer and Dajac Labs is a manufacturer of specialty monomers and polymers used for coatings, adhesives, medical devices, dental resins, water treatment, academic and industrial R&D.

Explore further: Carbon Nanotubes for State-of-the-art Packaging

More information: www.csiro.au/products/RAFT.html

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Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet Jul 06, 2010
How can you patent a chemical process?

What's next?

Hey I know, I want to patent combustion. No burning anything unless you pay me a royalty.

I mean get serious. Patents are precisely what is wrong with everyone today.

You shouldn't "own" knowledge just because you discovered it.

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