Cow-a-bella -- making eco-friendly diesel fuel from butter

July 29, 2010
Butter could provide an eco-friendly raw material for making biodiesel fuel. Credit: USDA, Agricultural Research Service

The search for new raw materials for making biodiesel fuel has led scientists to an unlikely farm product — butter. In a new study in ACS' bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they report that butter could be used as an eco-friendly feedstock, or raw material, for making diesel fuel.

Michael Haas and colleagues cite rising global demand for biodiesel, and the desire to expand the base, as motivating factors for their research. The United States alone has committed to producing 36 billion gallons of by 2022, a major increase from the current annual production level of about 11 billion gallons. Most of that was .

Biodiesel production, now approaching 1 billion gallons annually in the U.S., is also slated to increase. As researchers seek additional and affordable feedstocks for biodiesel production, these scientists turned to butter, one billion pounds of which are produced annually. Could surplus, spoiled, or nonfood-grade butter be used to make biodiesel at competitive prices?

In an effort to find out, the scientists recovered the fat from a quarter-ton of butter and converted it into the fatty acid esters that constitute biodiesel. They found that the resulting material met all but one of the official test standards for biodiesel. The study concluded that with further purification or by blending with biodiesel from other feedstocks butter biodiesel could add to the supply of biobased fuel for diesel engines.

Explore further: Biodiesel fuel use growing steadily

More information: "Butter as a Feedstock for Biodiesel Production", Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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rgwalther
not rated yet Jul 31, 2010
STOP using food products for fuel!. This is simply insane at every conceivable level. Fuel research with food products is acceptable only if the end result will be to facilitate fuel manufacture from non-food sources.
John_Kazer
not rated yet Aug 12, 2010
Couldn't agree more - the carbon footprint of butter is huge, a good proxy for resource intensity. The way in which "green" research is assessed for funding decisions needs to change - what a waste of money.

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