World first for quantum memory storage

June 24, 2010
Light passes through the crystal in the quantum memory experiment. Photo: ANU

( -- An Australian National University-led team has developed the most efficient quantum memory for light in the world, taking us closer to a future of super-fast computers and communication secured by the laws of physics.

The team at the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering used a technique they pioneered to stop and control light from a laser, manipulating in a crystal cooled to a chilly -270 degrees Celcius. The unprecedented efficiency and accuracy of the system allows the delicate quantum nature of the light to be stored, manipulated, and recalled.

“Light entering the crystal is slowed all the way to a stop, where it remains until we let it go again,” explains lead researcher Morgan Hedges. “When we do let it go, we get out essentially everything that went in as a three-dimensional hologram, accurate right down to the last photon.

“Because of the inherent uncertainty in , some of the information in this light will be lost the moment it is measured, making it a read-once hologram. Quantum mechanics guarantees this information can only be read once, making it perfect for secure communication.”

The same efficient and accurate qualities make the memory a leading prospect for , which has the potential to be many times faster and more powerful than contemporary computing.

In addition, the researchers say the light storage will allow tests of fundamental physics, such as how the bizarre phenomenon of quantum interacts with of the .

“We could entangle the quantum state of two memories, that is, two crystals,” says team leader Dr Matthew Sellars. “According to quantum mechanics, reading out one memory will instantly alter what is stored in the other, no matter how large the distance between them. According to relativity, the way time passes for one memory is affected by how it moves. With a good , an experiment to measure how these fundamental effects interact could be as simple as putting one crystal in the back of my car and going for a drive.”

Dr Sellars’ team has previously performed an experiment that ‘stopped’ in a crystal for over a second, more than 1,000 times longer than was previously possible. He said that the team is now bringing together systems that combine the high efficiency with storage times of hours.

The research team includes Dr Jevon Longdell from the University of Otago and Dr Yongmin Li from Shanxi University. The findings are published in Nature this week.

Explore further: Researchers violate Bell’s inequality with an atom and a photon

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2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 24, 2010
this nanotechnology has been published on a website
many years ago about this concept and is in
test bed development at 2 universities funded by
DOE and NSF. Search for a company called colossal
storage inc.

3 / 5 (4) Jun 27, 2010
Stopping light within a matter-wave is exactly the same physics on a macroscale which is reponsible for an orbital electron around a nucleus to absorb a light-wave. The absorbed light stops and its energy changes from moving with a speed c (no mass-energy) to mass-energy which entangles with the electron-wave. This, in turn, forces this electron-wave to morph "instantaneously" into a higher energy wave: The latter morphing of the wave has been erroneously called a "quantum-jump".

This "stopped" light-eneergy is then again released after a time-interval determined by resonance; so that the electron wave morphs "instantaneously" into a lower energy wave: A "quantum-jump" downwards in energy occurs. No "electron-particle" is involved. WHY WOULD A WAVE ONLY MORPH (COLLAPSE) INSTANTANEOUSLY WHEN ITS INTENSITY IS A PHYSICALLY IMPROBABLE "PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION"? Any wave MUST morph "instantaneously" when the change in boundary conditions requires it to do so. It has no other choice!

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