Video: Testing Underway to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

June 18, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Type 1 Diabetes, which affects almost 2 million individuals attacking children and young adults, is the second most common chronic condition in childhood.

People with Type 1 diabetes are born with a healthy pancreas, but then the body’s attacks the pancreas and sufferers must inject insulin to control their blood sugar or they die.

Years of blood sugar lows and highs can lead to blindness, kidney failure, and lower limb amputations.

Medical experts can now predict who will get Type 1 and currently medical teams at Vanderbilt are testing a way to stop the disease from developing.

One young boy is forging the way. Barb Cramer has the story in this Vanderbilt video.

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