Expecting Tropical Depression Alex in the Caribbean

Jun 25, 2010
The GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image on June 25 at 10:45 a.m. EDT of System 93L (large area of clouds far left) in the western Caribbean Sea which may become Alex and a second area of cloudiness and showers (far right) east of the Leeward Islands that forecasters are watching for tropical development. Credit: NASA GOES Project

Forecasters on June 25 had given System 93L in the western Caribbean an 80 percent chance of developing into Tropical Depression Alex, and weekends seem to always birth tropical depressions. The GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of both System 93L and a second low east of the Leeward Islands that has a much lesser chance of development this weekend.

The called GOES-13 captured a visible image of System 93L and the second area of cloudiness and showers east of the Leewards in a satellite image on June 25 at 14:45 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT). The satellite image was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. GOES-13 is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

System 93L has become better organized today and upper-level winds are becoming more conducive for development, so tropical depression Alex will likely form later today or Saturday.

System 93L has gusty winds and heavy rainfall, which will move slowly west-northwest and reach the Yucatan Peninsula this weekend. For weekend forecast updates on 93L (or Alex), visit the National Hurricane Center web site at: www.nhc.noaa.gov.

The second area that forecasters are watching this weekend is in the eastern Caribbean, east of the Leeward Islands. It's a disorganized area of clouds and showers that is associated with a tropical wave that's interacting with an upper-level trough. A trough is an elongated area of low pressure (and this one is in the upper level of the troposphere).

The National Hurricane Center only gives this system a 20 percent chance of development into a over the next 48 hours. The low is moving northwest between 10 and 15 mph.

Explore further: The Albian Gap, salt rock, and a heated debate

Related Stories

System 92L's chances for development are waning

Jun 15, 2010

Satellite imagery captured a visible look at System 92L earlier today, and it seems to be running into an environmental road block: upper level winds that are lessening its chances for development into a tropical ...

Still a low chance of development for two lows

Jul 22, 2009

The two areas of thunderstorms in the Caribbean from yesterday, July 21, are on the move. One area is now moving into out of the Caribbean and into the eastern Atlantic Ocean while the other is now moving ...

NASA satellite reveals a depressed and disorganized Henri

Oct 08, 2009

Depression happens to everyone, even tropical storms, and Henri is now tropically depressed. NASA satellite imagery has confirmed he's weakened to a tropical depression and he is further expected to degenerate ...

Recommended for you

The Albian Gap, salt rock, and a heated debate

3 hours ago

Salt rock behaves as a fluid and can play a pivotal role in the large-scale, long-term collapse of the world's continental margins. However, the precise way in which this occurs is laced in controversy; nowhere ...

Satellites catch the birth of two volcanic islands

13 hours ago

The birth of a volcanic island is a potent and beautiful reminder of our dynamic planet's ability to make new land. Given the destruction we've seen following natural events like earthquakes and tsunamis in t ...

Uncovering diversity in an invisible ocean world

14 hours ago

Plankton are vital to life on Earth—they absorb carbon dioxide, generate nearly half of the oxygen we breathe, break down waste, and are a cornerstone of the marine food chain. Now, new research indicates ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.