Detailed Martian Scenes in New Images from Mars Orbiter

June 9, 2010
This image shows the west-facing side of an impact crater in the mid-latitudes of Mars' northern hemisphere. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

( -- Six hundred recent observations of the Mars landscape from an orbiting telescopic camera include scenes of sinuous gullies, geometrical ridges and steep cliffs.

Each of the 600 newly released observations from the (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's covers an area of several square miles on Mars and reveals details as small as desks.

The HiRISE images taken from April 5 to May 6, 2010, are now available on NASA's Planetary Data System and the camera team's website.

This image from the Gordii Dorsum region of Mars shows a large area covered with polygonal ridges in an almost geometric pattern. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

The camera is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which reached Mars in 2006.

Explore further: One Mars Orbiter Takes First Photos of Other Orbiters

Related Stories

Thousands of New Images Show Mars in High Resolution

September 3, 2009

Thousands of newly released images from more than 1,500 telescopic observations by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show a wide range of gullies, dunes, craters, geological layering and other features on the Red Planet. ...

Public Invited To Pick Pixels on Mars

January 20, 2010

( -- The most powerful camera aboard a NASA spacecraft orbiting Mars will soon be taking photo suggestions from the public.

Recommended for you

Hubble captures a galactic waltz

November 26, 2015

This curious galaxy—only known by the seemingly random jumble of letters and numbers 2MASX J16270254+4328340—has been captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope dancing the crazed dance of a galactic merger. The ...

A blue, neptune-size exoplanet around a red dwarf star

November 25, 2015

A team of astronomers have used the LCOGT network to detect light scattered by tiny particles (called Rayleigh scattering), through the atmosphere of a Neptune-size transiting exoplanet. This suggests a blue sky on this world ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

3 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2010
This looks very similar to these images of drought on earth:
I wonder how they got there...

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.