Fully epitaxial microcavities: Open the door to quantum optoelectronic effects in the GaN-based system

June 16, 2010

For the very first time, a team of researchers in Germany has introduced quantum dots in fully epitaxial nitride laser structures without the need for hybrid systems -- effectively eliminating the cumbersome method of combining different materials from epitaxy and evaporation. This should help pave the way to a further optimization of lasers and single photon emitters in the visible spectrum region, according to the team.

A detailed description of their findings appears in the journal , which is published by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

"Gallium-nitride-based laser diodes are very promising materials for the development of efficient light sources in the UV-blue to green spectral region. They're already in use, for example, in BluRay (high-data-storage disc) players," explains Kathrin Sebald, the optics team's senior postdoctoral researcher from the University of Bremen's Institute of . "By reducing the size of the optically active material down to the nanometer scale (quantum dots), the efficiency of such devices can be increased much further -- opening the door to the use of quantum optoelectronic effects."

When combined with optical microcavities, the emitted light can be confined to ultra-small volumes by resonant recirculation. In such quantum optical devices, microcavities can coax to emit spontaneous photons in a desired direction, which leads to an enormously increased output, Sebald notes. Applications of these devices are as diverse as their properties.

Explore further: Engineers at USC and UT-Austin boost the sensitivity of night vision goggles by using quantum dots

More information: The article, " Optical properties of InGaN quantum dots in monolithic pillar microcavities" by Kathrin Sebald et al will appear in the journal Applied Physics Letters. apl.aip.org/

Related Stories

Quantum electronics: Two photons and chips

January 20, 2006

Scientists at Toshiba Research Europe Limited (Cambridge, UK) believe they are on to a way of producing entangled twins of photons using a simple semiconductor electronic device. Such a chip-based source of entangled photons ...

Quantum dots as midinfrared emitters

February 23, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- “People are interested in the mid-infrared,” Dan Wasserman tells PhysOrg.com. Infrared light has a wavelength longer than visible light, and many molecules have numerous very strong optical resonances ...

A solid case of entanglement

January 11, 2010

Physicists have finally managed to demonstrate quantum entanglement of spatially separated electrons in solid state circuitry.

Single photons step into the slow light

February 22, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- European experts in nanotechnology, optoelectronics and quantum physics have advanced the generation, detection and manipulation of single photons in semiconductors. Their discoveries bring practical single-photon ...

Recommended for you

Reshaping the solar spectrum to turn light to electricity

July 28, 2015

When it comes to installing solar cells, labor cost and the cost of the land to house them constitute the bulk of the expense. The solar cells—made often of silicon or cadmium telluride—rarely cost more than 20 percent ...

Could stronger, tougher paper replace metal?

July 24, 2015

Researchers at the University of Maryland recently discovered that paper made of cellulose fibers is tougher and stronger the smaller the fibers get. For a long time, engineers have sought a material that is both strong (resistant ...

Changing the color of light

July 23, 2015

Researchers at the University of Delaware have received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to explore a new idea that could improve solar cells, medical imaging and even cancer treatments. Simply put, they want ...

Wafer-thin material heralds future of wearable technology

July 27, 2015

UOW's Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM) has successfully pioneered a way to construct a flexible, foldable and lightweight energy storage device that provides the building blocks for next-generation ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.