Dr. Mitola and cognitive radio are featured on Computing Now

June 23, 2010

Dr. Joseph Mitola III, Vice President for the Research Enterprise at Stevens Institute of Technology, is the subject of a recent article on Computing Now which details the benefits and development of Cognitive Radio (CR), the intelligent wireless technology coined by Dr. Mitola in 1999.

" are becoming increasingly complex as more devices - including laptops, cellular phones, and even sensors - compete for limited bandwidth in various frequency ranges," says author George Lawton. "In addition, devices must conform in a growing number of ways to user needs, corporate policies, and government regulations. Proponents say cognitive radios - currently the subject of considerable research and early implementation - appear to answer these challenges."

CR is an emerging radio approach championed by Stevens Institute of Technology in which transceivers are combined with sensors, intelligence, and adaptability. These capabilities will enable radios that monitor transmissions and the network environment and change parameters such as frequency, energy-usage levels, and protocols to adapt as necessary.

CR augments RF awareness via a database of licensed users of the slices of spectrum being analyzed, as well as their geographic coordinates. This technology would also detect spectrum users that aren't working via RF, such as TV broadcasters. "Location awareness is an important new dimension of cognitive radio," says Stevens Professor Yingying (Jennifer) Chen, "FCC datbases provide a starting point, but high fidelity location accurate to centimeters rather than the ten meters of GPS is an important emerging research area."

The article goes into detail on the network protocols and methods on which CR is built. It concludes by identifying target markets and traditional technologies that CR may revolutionize. Among these are military uses, particularly for interoperability among radios using different technologies and spectrum ranges. Television is another avenue; "In the UK and the US, regulators are considering opening up TV white space - frequencies allocated to a television service but not used - for unlicensed wireless communications applications." Cognitive Radio may also be used by cellular providers in dramatically reducing interference.

As evidenced by the array of interested parties in CR, Dr. Mitola and the research being conducted at Stevens Institute of Technology are addressing the needs of industry and providing critical information. In fact, Dr. Mitola recently concluded a European trip in which he delivered keynote addresses to international wireless conferences: SMi International Software Radio conference; and CrownCom 2010 International Conference on Cognitive Radio Oriented Wireless Networks and Communication

"Security and the high costs of porting applications from last years' handset to the new multicore network on chip offer significant new research opportunities," explained Dr. Mitola in his CrownCom keynote address.

Explore further: Infineon unveils low-noise SiGeC transistor

Related Stories

Infineon unveils low-noise SiGeC transistor

September 2, 2005

Germany's Infineon Technologies unveiled a silicon-germanium-carbon (SiGeC) process technology for high-performance radio-frequency semiconductor devices.

Averting radio spectrum saturation, opportunistically

April 2, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Mobile users want better video calls, streaming television and faster downloads, placing more demands on the limited radio spectrum available to operators. Could handsets that intelligently sense their radio ...

Recommended for you

Internet giants race to faster mobile news apps

October 4, 2015

US tech giants are turning to the news in their competition for mobile users, developing new, faster ways to deliver content, but the benefits for struggling media outlets remain unclear.

Radio frequency 'harvesting' tech unveiled in UK

September 30, 2015

An energy harvesting technology that its developers say will be able to turn ambient radio frequency waves into usable electricity to charge low power devices was unveiled in London on Wednesday.

Professors say US has fallen behind on offshore wind power

September 29, 2015

University of Delaware faculty from the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE), the College of Engineering and the Alfred Lerner School of Business and Economics say that the U.S. has fallen behind in offshore wind ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.