Chip makers start joint venture for improving Linux distribution

June 7, 2010 by Lin Edwards report

( -- A new software engineering joint venture called Linaro has been set up by six major chip making companies including IBM, ARM Holdings, Texas Instruments and Samsung Electronics, with the aim of dedicating itself to improving Linux distributions for use in devices such as phones, netbooks, tablets, and TVs.

The aim of the is to give open-source developers the software and tools they need to accelerate and simplify development of Linux for portable devices using ARM-based system-on-a-chip (SoC) designs. The founders say they will release tools, kernel and middleware software for a variety of SoCs based on the ARM Cortex-A processors every six months, beginning in November 2010.

At present consumer devices use a variety of operating systems such as Apple, Windows, Blackberry, Intel, Palm, and Nokia’s Symbian. Linux operating systems in mobile phones are growing, and there are already a number of Linux versions that run on ARM chips, including Ubuntu and Debian. There is also a Red Hat Fedora Linux version for ARM, but it is not yet commercially available.

Linux is the most popular open-source available, and is a direct rival of Microsoft on personal computers and the open-source Symbian on phones. Google’s and MeeGo, LiMo and webOS are among the Linux operating systems, and the establishment of Linaro should simplify the development of Linux versions and accelerate their uptake, by enabling developers to concentrate on the user interface rather than the kernel and middleware. The inclusion in Linaro’s plans of MeeGo, which was developed by Nokia and Intel, suggests Intel will be involved at some stage, but the initial focus of the group will be on ARM chips.

The other two companies that have signed up to the non-profit foundation are ST-Ericsson and , but other companies are welcome to join the group. The companies have pledged tens of millions of dollars a year to fund the project, according to the interim CEO of Linaro, Tom Lantzsch. The foundation will work with Linux to align their core operating principles, and will contribute to a variety of open source projects.

The formation of the Linaro foundation was announced in Taipei in Taiwan on June 3 at the Computex trade show. According to Ben Cade, co-CEO, the present growth is in always-on, always-connected devices powered by SoCs, and the joint venture is expected to increase the numbers of such devices using distributions.

Explore further: Red Flag Delivers First Commercial Version Of Linux Compiled With Intel Compiler

More information: Linaro:

Related Stories

Nokia announces patent support to the Linux Kernel

May 26, 2005

Nokia Corporation announced today that it allows all its patents to be used in the further development of the Linux Kernel. Nokia believes that open source software communities, like open standards, foster innovation and ...

Verizon Wireless downplays Linux phones

April 1, 2009

(AP) -- Verizon Wireless considers Linux-based software a possible long-term contender for use on its phones, but doesn't view it as a "preferred" solution, the carrier's head said.

Nokia, Intel join forces in mobile software battle

February 15, 2010

US chip maker Intel and Finnish mobile phone giant Nokia announced Monday the launch of a joint software platform that will power a wide range of devices from smartphones to pocket computers.

Recommended for you

The ethics of robot love

November 25, 2015

There was to have been a conference in Malaysia last week called Love and Sex with Robots but it was cancelled. Malaysian police branded it "illegal" and "ridiculous". "There is nothing scientific about sex with robots," ...

Nevada researchers trying to turn roadside weed into biofuel

November 26, 2015

Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed—curly top gumweed—was ...


Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

5 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2010
Google has shown that a single company can successfully challenge Microsoft dominance and now others follow suit.
3 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2010
This is good. Revolution was once described to me as "going full circle". We have come full circle. Originally the microcomputer OS was a simple affair that allowed applications the use of the peripherals along with scheduling and storage matters. The mercenary and oppressive "do it my way" attitudes of MS, Apple, IBM, HP, etc., did not advance technology very much. That attitude channeled wealth into these few hands that wages (and has always waged) war on each other at the expense of the user. Linux lets the skilled programmers become creative again in an open market of ideas instead of a closed market of OS/word-processing monopolies and H/W S/W cartels. The kinds of people who wrote entrepreneurial applications for the TRS-80, Apple 1 and 2, Unix, etc. have reclaimed their (and thus, our) rights to say what we want and then write S/W to do it in an open framework operating system. MS is OBE. By the way, Google, is an MS wanna-be.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.