NASA catapults new Orion capsule into NM desert

May 6, 2010
The new Orion crew capsule is catapulted into the air on Thursday, May 6, 2010 at White Sands Missile Range, N.M., during a test of Orion's launch-abort system, which will whisk astronauts and the capsule to safety in case of a problem on the launch pad, such as a fire, or during the climb to orbit. The Orion capsule was originally designed to take astronauts back to the moon. But President Obama in February killed NASA's $100 billion plans to return to the moon, redirecting the money for new rocket technology research. (AP Photo/Craig Fritz)

(AP) -- NASA engineers catapulted the new Orion crew capsule about a mile into the air Thursday morning as hundreds of people gathered to watch.

The launch at White Sands Missile Range in the barren southern New Mexico desert left a stream of white smoke as the unmanned capsule arched through the sky, deployed a parachute and landed about a mile north of the launch site.

The tests are aimed at Orion's launch-abort system, which will whisk astronauts and the capsule to safety in case of a problem on the launch pad, such as a fire, or during the climb to orbit.

Jeff Sheehy, a engineer working on the capsule, said the test appeared to be successful.

The Orion capsule was originally designed to take astronauts back to the moon. But President in February killed NASA's $100 billion plans to return to the moon, redirecting the money for new rocket technology research.

One proposal is to send the capsule to the to be used as an escape vehicle, so U.S. wouldn't have to rely on the Russian Soyuz for an emergency flight home.

"It will transition to some useful purpose," Sheehy said. "What that is remains to be seen."

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Nik_2213
not rated yet May 06, 2010
License it to the COTS rocket-builders ? Should make their insurers a lot happier knowing the escape system works...
Doug_Huffman
not rated yet May 06, 2010
Begs the meaning modus ponens of 'catapult'.
ZeroDelta
not rated yet May 06, 2010
I like the COTS idea, since SpaceX and ULA are developing crew vehicles for their rockets.

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