Image filters improve image quality and lower patient radiation dose associated with CT scans

May 3, 2010

Adaptive image filters can lower the patient radiation associated with chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans while significantly improving image quality, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2010 Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

Image filters are one of the tools used in to lower image "noise" in low CT. "As we lower the radiation dose, the CT images become "noisy" or speckled which makes it difficult to view the organs or the body structures in the image," said Sarabjeet Singh, MD, lead author of the study. "Image filters allow us to effectively lower the radiation dose without sacrificing the image clarity," said Singh.

The study, performed at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, included 12 patients who received a at four different levels of radiation dose in the chest and abdomen. All low dose images were processed with adaptive filters, and "regardless of radiation dose, post processing with image filters improved subjective noise for both chest and abdominal CT and helped lower the CT radiation dose levels for chest by up to 40 mAs and for the abdominal CT by up to 100 mAs," said Singh.

"With the increasing use of CT, radiation dose concerns have been rising in the medical community, patients, as well as the media. Hence various efforts have been made to lower the radiation dose associated with CT scanning," he said.

"There are many ways to lower patient radiation dose associated with CT scans. However, the filters are one of the simpler ways of reducing radiation dose with CT. They only require a selection of preset settings that can be applied automatically to improve image quality and thus enable lowering of the radiation dose," said Singh.

Explore further: Radiation dose can be reduced for 'triple rule-out' coronary CT angiography

Related Stories

Radiation dose drastically reduced during whole chest MDCT

June 24, 2009

Emergency physicians who evaluate patients with non-specific chest pain using whole chest multi-detector CT (MDCT) combined with retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating can reduce the patient radiation dose by 71% using ...

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.