Giant dinosaur footprints found in Argentine 'Jurassic Park'

May 12, 2010
A dinosaur replica is displayed during an exhibition of the "Dinosaurs of the Patagonia" in 2009. Dinosaur footprints up to 1.2 meters (four feet) in diameter have been found in an area of Patagonia known as Argentina's "Jurassic Park," a scientist said Wednesday.

Dinosaur footprints up to 1.2 meters (four feet) in diameter have been found in an area of Patagonia known as Argentina's "Jurassic Park," a scientist said Wednesday.

Jorge Calvo of the National University of Comahue said the footprints are "sauropod dinosaur tracks of different sizes," and were "in good condition."

The scientist estimated that the footprints found "more than 90 million years old."

The area is considered one of the most important paleontological sites in , a region where in 1993 remains were found of the Giganotosaurus carolinii, the largest carnivorous dinosaur in the world.

The footprints were stumbled upon several days ago by a yoga instructor performing exercises in Los Barreales, in Neuquen province in southern Argentina.

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