Impossible to separate Gaza-born conjoined twins: doctors

April 10, 2010

Saudi doctors said Friday that it is not possible to safely separate conjoined twins born in the Gaza Strip and sent to Riyadh for treatment.

The lives of the two-week-old girls born joined at the chest with conjoined hearts would be too much at risk in a separation procedure, Saudi Health Minister Dr. Abdullah al-Rabeeah said in a statement issued through the SPA news agency.

Doctors had found the girls Ritaj and Rittal Abu Assi had serious defects in their , liver and digestive systems, he said.

Saudi King Abdullah had sponsored their transfer Tuesday from besieged Gaza to Riyadh to see if separation at the King Abdulaziz Medical City hospital was possible.

Doctors did not comment on the medical status of the girls, but on Wednesday they were said to be in critical condition.

The hospital has a unit specializing in and Rabeeah frequently leads separation operations.

Explore further: Surgeons separate conjoined twins

Related Stories

Surgeons separate conjoined twins

May 12, 2006

Surgeons at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Friday began to separate Abbigail and Isabelle Carlsen, five-month-old cojoined twins from Fargo, N.D.

Conjoined N.D. twins' condition upgraded

May 16, 2006

Former conjoined twins Abbigail and Isabelle Carlsen of Fargo, N.D., were upgraded to serious condition Monday, officials at the Mayo Clinic said.

Separated twins now breathing on their own

August 14, 2006

Conjoined twins Maliyah and Kendra Herrin, after undergoing a 26-hour surgery to separate them, are now breathing on their own at a Salt Lake City hospital.

Conjoined twins delivered

October 26, 2006

A team of 16 Canadian doctors at a Vancouver hospital succeeded in delivering conjoined twin girls after a 65-minute caesarean section procedure on the mother.

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.