Astronauts move old space station docking port

February 16, 2010 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
In this photo provided by NASA, astronaut Robert Behnken participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station, Sunday, Feb. 14, 2010. (AP Photo/NASA)

(AP) -- Astronauts did some rearranging at the International Space Station for the second night in a row Monday, moving an old docking adapter into a new position.

A pair of spacemen used the station's hefty to remove the 10-year-old adapter from the space station and transfer it to a port at the new room, . There, it will provide an extra parking spot for visiting vessels and serve as a buffer against micrometeorite hits.

As that work was going on, the crews of the shuttle and station were connecting power and data lines in the new $27 million observation deck that was moved to its permanent location early Monday. Later this week, the domed, seven-windowed lookout will get its most important addition: a robotic work station for operating the station's mechanical arm.

"It's a beautiful module," said shuttle pilot Terry Virts.

Monday's work unfolded on the eve of the third and final spacewalk of Endeavour's mission. Robert Behnken and Nicholas Patrick will venture back out Tuesday night and unlock the shutters on the lookout's windows, enabling their colleagues inside to crank open the shutters.

The can't wait to gaze down at Earth through those windows; the center one is the biggest window ever flown in space.

Behnken and Patrick were the ones who operated the robot arm during Monday night's moving operation.

"Take the rest of the afternoon off," Mission Control radioed after the relocation job was completed. Mission Control gave the two crews Tuesday morning off to prepare for the finale; it's afternoon to the astronauts, who are working the graveyard shift in orbit.

Endeavour and its crew of six will depart the space station Friday after a visit of 1 1/2 weeks. They've already accomplished their major objective: delivering and installing Tranquility and the , European contributions.

Explore further: Truss Work, Spacewalk Preps on Tap Today

0 shares

Related Stories

Truss Work, Spacewalk Preps on Tap Today

October 29, 2007

The Space Shuttle Discovery and International Space Station crews are using the station and shuttle robotic arms to move the P6 truss segment and preparing for Tuesday’s spacewalk, the third of the mission. The crews will ...

Endeavour to bring high-tech 'sunroom' to ISS

January 29, 2010

The US space shuttle Endeavour will carry the last major component needed to complete the International Space Station and a high-tech "sunroom" called a cupola next week, officials said Friday.

Space station gets room, huge window to see Earth

February 12, 2010

(AP) -- Astronauts put the last big addition on the International Space Station early Friday, attaching a new room with an enormous bay window that promises to provide unprecedented panoramic views of Earth.

Space Station gains a new room: Node-3 installed

February 15, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Almost exactly two years after the Columbus laboratory was added to the Space Station, the hi-tech Node-3, also ‘made in Europe’, was installed on the ISS this morning.

Recommended for you

Dense star clusters shown to be binary black hole factories

July 29, 2015

The coalescence of two black holes—a very violent and exotic event—is one of the most sought-after observations of modern astronomy. But, as these mergers emit no light of any kind, finding such elusive events has been ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

RoboticExplorer
not rated yet Feb 16, 2010
So could this module be considered the "Bridge" of the ISS or is it more like "10 Forward"?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.