Fujitsu USB 3.0-SATA Bridge IC Earns USB-IF Compliance Certification for SuperSpeed USB

Jan 08, 2010

Fujitsu Microelectronics America today announced that its USB 3.0-SATA bridge IC has been certified as compliant with the USB 3.0 standard by the USB Implementers Forum, Inc.

The MB86C30 bridge IC has passed USB-IF compliance testing for product quality. The MB86C30 improves data-transfer rates from external storage devices (such as hard disk drives) to PCs by an order of magnitude compared with USB 2.0 devices. The IC incorporates on a single chip the USB communication control circuits, SATA communication control circuits, protocol-control and command-control circuits, and an /decryption engine.

"We are pleased that the Fujitsu MB86C30 .0-SATA device earned USB-IF compliance and certification," said Fujio Nakanishi, ASSP business unit president, Fujitsu Microelectronics Limited. "The SuperSpeed USB specification is ideal for the new generation of external drives and consumer mass storage systems that will be available early this year."

To complement the specification and enable measurement of compliance in real products, the USB-IF has instituted a compliance program that provides reasonable measures of acceptability. Products that demonstrate this level of acceptability are added to the Integrators List and have the right to license the USB-IF logo. To learn more about the USB Implementers Forum visit www.usb.org/developers/ssusb .

Explore further: Supercomputers a hidden power center of Silicon Valley

More information: The Fujitsu MB86C30A USB 3.0-SATA bridge IC fact sheet: www.fujitsu.com/downloads/MICRO/fma/pdf/USB30_MB86C30.pdf

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