Survey: Most drivers support regulation of cell phones in cars

September 4, 2009 By Tim Barker

A new study by Nationwide Insurance found that U.S. drivers are largely in favor of laws that would restrict the use of cell phones -- for texting, e-mail, and talking -- in cars. The results are pretty interesting when you consider that most states aren't doing all that much to stop distracted driving.

The survey of 1,008 adults was conducted in early August. Among the findings:

• 80 percent of respondents support a ban on text messaging while driving.

• 80 percent of respondents support a ban on e-mailing while driving.

• 67 percent of respondents say they are supportive of laws restricting phone calls while driving.

Nationwide's safety officer, Bill Windsor, said the survey should bolster the arguments of those who have been pushing for more laws targeting cell phone use by .

At present, no state bans cell phone use by drivers. Half a dozen required drivers to use hands-free devices.And only 18 states, including Illinois, ban text messaging by drivers. In Missouri, only divers under 21 are barred from texting while driving.

"The new information in this also indicates that many drivers are either in denial about their DWD habits or resistant to changing their behavior," said Windsor. "This suggests that legislation may not be enough to eliminate distracted driving and highlights the need for a technological solution that can prevent usage in moving vehicles while still allowing people to stay connected."
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(c) 2009, St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Visit the Post-Dispatch on the World Wide Web at www.stltoday.com/
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Explore further: Rural drivers using cell phones are likely to cause accidents

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2 comments

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rwinners
not rated yet Sep 05, 2009
Current laws are just designed to establish 'guilt' for traffic accidents. The communications industry and the insurance industry have come to some sort of agreement.
It certainly isn't about safety.
VOR
not rated yet Sep 07, 2009
all this crap we constantly hear, and nothing about

suggested ways to call and text safely. Yes, it is possible. what's the secret? Always think more about accidentally dying or killing someone at every given instant than about that trivial crap you are doing with your gadget. Yeah its common sense that a few of us seem to lack.

There are lots of detailed techniques (attention prioritizing) that would come from the basic principle of 'safety first' but I've seen nothing published anywhere... Just 'ban it'. Real sophisticated. typical.

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