US sends 2 missile defense satellites into orbit

September 25, 2009

(AP) -- Two satellites are heading to orbit as part of a missile defense program demonstration.

The pair was launched aboard a Delta 2 rocket on Friday morning as part of the Space Tracking and Surveillance System demonstration for the U.S. Missile Defense Agency.

According to Bob Bishop, media relations manager for developer Northrop Grumman, the satellites will demonstrate technology that can detect infrared and visible light from missiles launched from earth. The space surveillance system will provide global tracking for the ballistic missile defense system.

Data from the satellites' onboard sensors will be used by the military to intercept missile targets.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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jsovine
5 / 5 (1) Sep 25, 2009
I thought this was an international no-no?
croghan27
not rated yet Sep 25, 2009
I thought this was an international no-no?


I am quite sure the militarization of space is a major no-no.
defunctdiety
5 / 5 (2) Sep 25, 2009
As far as we're being told above, there is no weaponization in space here. Just detection and tracking systems. And those types of things have been up there for quite a while now. i.e. military observation satellites are not new and apparently not a no-no.
weewilly
not rated yet Sep 26, 2009
With the world ready to explode at any moment in time what ever time can be gained by knowing in advance of an in-coming strike would be a great advantage even if just ducking for cover. I for one would appreciate knowing a little before time if I was going to be breathing an hour later. To stop using this type of technology first change the nature of the human race. From recorded time man has been at war or odds with others of his species. I'm all ears here but until that time let us have a strong defensive posture. I'm not a war monger but I have lived long enough to know the facts about human history.

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