Great white sharks tagged for first time off Mass.

Sep 06, 2009
This image provided by the Massachusets State Division of Marine Fisheries shows a great white shark swimming in the waters near Cape Cod Mass. in Oct. 2004. Massachusetts officials are using high-tech tags to track the movements of two great white sharks near Cape Cod _ the first time the fearsome fish have ever been tagged in the Atlantic Ocean. The sharks were spotted Saturday Sept. 5, 2009 by scientists investigating sightings off Monomoy Island in Chatham. Sharks are common in Cape waters during summer, though great white sharks are relatively rare around New England. (AP Photo/Massachusets State Division of Marine Fisheries)

(AP) -- Massachusetts officials are using high-tech tags to track the movements of two great white sharks near Cape Cod - the first time the fearsome fish have ever been tagged in the Atlantic Ocean.

The electronic tag uses technology to record the travels of the sharks, allowing scientists to better understand their migratory patterns.

The sharks were spotted Saturday by scientists investigating sightings off Monomoy Island in Chatham. Officials say a harpooner tagged them with help from a state shark expert.

Sharks are common in Cape waters during summer, though great white sharks are relatively rare around New England.

State officials have warned area swimmers to be on the lookout for sharks this weekend, and state environmental police are patrolling the area as a precaution.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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