Google pays homage to H.G. Wells

September 21, 2009
The front page of Google search showing UFOs invading its celebrated logo as the Internet giant said it was paying homage to British science fiction writer H.G. Wells.

Google provided an explanation Monday for flying saucers invading its celebrated logo -- the Internet giant was paying homage to British science fiction writer H.G. Wells.

The Mountain View, California-based company frequently changes the colorful logo on its famously sparse home page to mark anniversaries or significant events.

But it generally makes it clear what is being celebrated.

Not so the case with a recent tweak of its logo.

Last week, the word "" was spelled out in a series of crop circles topped by a picture of a flying saucer. Google also provided a set of latitude and longitude coordinates.

The coordinates pointed to Horsell Commons, the location of the alien landing in Wells' 1898 classic, "The War of the Worlds," giving rise to speculation that Wells was involved.

Google revealed all on Monday and said that it was celebrating the 143rd birthday of Wells, who was born on September 21, 1866.

"Inspiration for innovation in technology and design can come from lots of places," Google said in a blog post. "We wanted to celebrate H.G. Wells as an author who encouraged fantastical thinking about what is possible, on this planet and beyond."

(c) 2009 AFP

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