Verizon Wireless uses new network for first time

August 14, 2009

(AP) -- Verizon Wireless says it has completed the first calls using a brand-new network that's planned to go live next year, offering faster Internet speeds.

The calls were made Friday in Boston and earlier in Seattle, using cell-tower equipment from Alcatel-Lucent and LM Ericsson AB. Prototype tablet-style handheld devices from Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. dialed in.

The calls used the 700 megahertz frequency band, just recently freed up for cellular use after being assigned to TV stations.

Verizon Wireless' , Tony Melone, says the trials gave confidence that the commercial launch would yield average download speeds of 7 to 12 megabits per second, faster than current wireless broadband.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Briefs: Qualcomm, Verizon team on cell-phone TV

Related Stories

Verizon offers to cut exclusive time for phones

May 8, 2009

(AP) -- Verizon Wireless has offered to shorten the period in which it demands exclusive rights to new cell phones from LG and Samsung in an effort to give small rural carriers a better chance to sell up-to-date phones.

Clearwire adds Chinese company to supplier list

August 11, 2009

(AP) -- Huawei, a Chinese company that is edging into the U.S. market for telecommunications gear as a competitor to Motorola and Alcatel-Lucent, has scored another contract win.

Recommended for you

Facebook ready to test giant drone for Internet service

July 30, 2015

Facebook says it will begin test flights later this year for a solar-powered drone with a wingspan as big as a Boeing 737, in the next stage of its campaign to deliver Internet connectivity to remote parts of the world.

Power grid forecasting tool reduces costly errors

July 30, 2015

Accurately forecasting future electricity needs is tricky, with sudden weather changes and other variables impacting projections minute by minute. Errors can have grave repercussions, from blackouts to high market costs. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.