YouTube doubles video file size to 2G

July 1, 2009
YouTube webpage. Video-sharing site YouTube announced on Wednesday that it was doubling the size limit for uploads to its website to allow users to post more high-definition (HD) video.

Video-sharing site YouTube announced on Wednesday that it was doubling the size limit for uploads to its website to allow users to post more high-definition (HD) video.

YouTube, in a blog post, said the size limit for uploads to the site was being doubled -- from one to two gigabytes.

"The increase means you can upload longer videos at a higher resolution as well as large HD files directly from your camera," said.

"The changes allow you to share links directly to the HD version of your , as well as embed the HD version on your blog or website," it said.

HD video is increasingly popular but the higher resolution results in larger files.

A YouTube spokesman told AFP that while file size for individual videos was being increased to two gigabytes, the 10-minute length restriction for videos posted on the site remains in place.

(c) 2009 AFP

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