Gizmodo, Engadget founder launches new gadget site

July 1, 2009
The founder of two of the most popular gadget sites on the Web, Gizmodo and Engadget, launched, another destination for technology junkies on Wednesday.

The founder of two of the most popular gadget sites on the Web, Gizmodo and Engadget, launched another destination for technology junkies on Wednesday., the latest creation of Peter Rojas, describes itself as a social platform for lovers of computers, mobile phones, digital cameras, MP3 players, videogame consoles and other items.

"GDGT is a new kind of technology site -- a social gadget platform that enables you to connect with the community through your , and connect with your through the community.

"It's a place for you to engage with your devices and hang out with people who are as passionate about their gear as you are."

GDGT allows users -- the community -- to discuss and post their own reviews of the latest electronics and features detailed specifications and pictures of the items broken down into categories.

The site drew so much traffic on its launch on Wednesday that it crashed.

"We are working furiously to get this damn site working again," the GDGT team said in a message on their Twitter feed. "We're adding new servers right now."

GDGT eventually overcame its teething problems and was back online.

(c) 2009 AFP

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