Chern numbers of algebraic varieties

June 10, 2009

A problem at the interface of two mathematical areas, topology and algebraic geometry, that was formulated by Friedrich Hirzebruch, had resisted all attempts at a solution for more than 50 years. The problem concerns the relationship between different mathematical structures. Professor Dieter Kotschick, a mathematician at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, has now achieved a breakthrough. As reported in the online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), Kotschick has solved Hirzebruch's problem.

Topology studies flexible properties of geometric objects that are unchanged by continuous deformations. In algebraic geometry some of these objects are endowed with additional structure derived from an explicit description by polynomial equations. Hirzebruch's problem concerns the relation between flexible and rigid properties of geometric objects.

Viewed topologically, the surface of a ball is always a sphere, even when the ball is very deformed: precise geometric shapes are not important in topology. This is different in algebraic geometry, where objects like the sphere are described by polynomial equations. Professor Dieter Kotschick has recently achieved a breakthrough at the interface of topology and algebraic geometry.

"I was able to solve a problem that was formulated more than 50 years ago by the influential German mathematician Friedrich Hirzebruch", says Kotschick. "Hirzebruch's problem concerns the relation between different mathematical structures. These are so-called algebraic varieties, which are the zero-sets of polynomials, and certain geometric objects called manifolds." Manifolds are smooth topological spaces that can be considered in arbitrary dimensions. The spherical surface of a ball is just a two-dimensional manifold.

In mathematical terminology Hirzebruch's problem was to determine which Chern numbers are topological invariants of complex-algebraic varieties. "I have proved that - except for the obvious ones - no Chern numbers are topologically invariant", says Kotschick. "Thus, these numbers do indeed depend on the algebraic structure of a variety, and are not determined by coarser, so-called topological properties. Put differently: The underlying manifold of an algebraic variety does not determine these invariants."

The solution to Hirzebruch's problem is announced in the current issue of PNAS Early Edition, the online version of PNAS.

Source: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Explore further: Mathematic innovator Raoul Bott dies

Related Stories

Mathematic innovator Raoul Bott dies

January 9, 2006

Raoul Bott, a mathematician who made innovative contributions to differential geometry and topology, has died at the age of 82.

Recommended for you

Just how good (or bad) is the fossil record of dinosaurs?

August 28, 2015

Everyone is excited by discoveries of new dinosaurs – or indeed any new fossil species. But a key question for palaeontologists is 'just how good is the fossil record?' Do we know fifty per cent of the species of dinosaurs ...

Fractals patterns in a drummer's music

August 28, 2015

Fractal patterns are profoundly human – at least in music. This is one of the findings of a team headed by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen and Harvard University ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

ShotmanMaslo
not rated yet Jun 10, 2009
ehm.....what?
mattytheory
not rated yet Jun 10, 2009
I don't think I understood everything but from what did understand I thought it was interesting.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.