Porpoise is 2nd to give birth in captivity

May 8, 2009
File photo shows a finless porpose at Wuhan Baji Aquarium in China. A porpoise at Harderwijk dolphin centre in the Netherlands has become only the second to give birth in captivity, the centre announced, but the happy event leaves an enigma: is it a boy or a girl?

A porpoise at Harderwijk dolphin centre in the Netherlands has become only the second to give birth in captivity, the centre announced, but the happy event leaves an enigma: is it a boy or a girl?

"Mum Amber and her baby, Kwin, are doing fine," the centre said in a statement on Thursday.

A first porpoise was born in captivity in Denmark in 2007.

"As we don't know much about newborn porpoises, a team of Danish minders has come to help us," the statement said.

Visitors can already come to coo over the baby, but there's no way of discovering its sex for several weeks.

Another tiny problem: who's the proud father?

Kwin's dad is not known for certain as "two males were swimming with Amber at the moment of conception," the dolphin centre said.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Bacteria responsible for the death of Maui’s dolphins

Related Stories

Dubai claims world's first cloned camel

April 14, 2009

The United Arab Emirates on Tuesday claimed its own version of Dolly the sheep, the world's first cloned mammal, after the birth of a cloned camel in Dubai this month.

Recommended for you

Genomes uncover life's early history

August 24, 2015

A University of Manchester scientist is part of a team which has carried out one of the biggest ever analyses of genomes on life of all forms.

Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in three decades

August 25, 2015

In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers ...

Study shows female frogs susceptible to 'decoy effect'

August 28, 2015

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers has found that female túngaras, frogs that live in parts of Mexico and Central and South America, appear to be susceptible to the "decoy effect." In their paper published in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.