Placement of dental implants results in minimal bone loss

May 12, 2009

Dental implants are frequently used as a replacement for missing teeth in order to restore the patient's tooth function and appearance. Previous research demonstrates that the placement of a dental implant disrupts the host tissue in the area of the implant, so practitioners often focus their treatment planning to carefully maintain the patient's bone and gum tissue surrounding the implant.

A recent study published in the Journal of Periodontology found that the majority of bone remodeling occurred in the time between the implant placement and final prosthesis placement. Subsequently, little mean bone change was observed in the five years following the implant placement, independent of type of restoration or implant length.

The study, conducted at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, evaluated 596 dental implants placed in 192 patients over the age of 18. were screened for adequate oral hygiene and bone volume. Exclusion criteria included heavy smoking, chewing tobacco use, drug abuse, and untreated periodontal disease, amongst others.

Study author David Cochran, DDS, PhD, Chair of the Department of Periodontics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and President of the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), believes that this study provides additional support for the use of dental implants to replace missing teeth.

"As a periodontist, I am committed to saving my patients' natural dentition whenever possible. However, the results of this study help further indicate that a dental implant is an effective and dependable tooth replacement option. Since the patient's host tissue surrounding the dental implant largely remains unchanged in the five years following placement, the dental team can now focus on periodic assessment and treatment of other areas in the mouth as needed, and know that the implant is doing its job as a viable substitute solution."

Source: American Academy of Periodontology (news : web)

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googleplex
not rated yet May 12, 2009
The main issue is to drill slowly and don't over heat the bone when doing the implant. If there is high temperature as a result of drilling the hole for the implant then some bone will die off. In extreme cases the implant will fail. Usually the bone re-grows.
Implants are good because they maintain the biting force acting on the bone which stimulates bone growth. Denture do not act the same and therefore result in a greater degree of boneloss.

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