Analog TV signals to be interrupted in 'soft test'

May 20, 2009

(AP) -- TV stations around the country will replace their analog broadcasts for a few minutes Thursday with reminders that those broadcasts will disappear completely in three weeks.

The stations have to turn off their analog broadcasts on June 12 as part of a nationwide mandate to move to more efficient . For Thursday's "soft test," analog broadcasts will be interrupted for two to five minutes once in the morning, once just after noon, at once in the early evening, around 6:30 p.m. local time for most stations.

Households that have all their sets hooked up to cable or satellite feeds will be unaffected by the analog shutdown - which already happened on many stations in February.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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