Adobe extends Flash to TVs, Blu-ray players

April 20, 2009

(AP) -- Adobe Systems Inc. is extending its Flash platform to digital home entertainment devices like TV sets, Blu-ray players and set-top boxes.

Adobe announced Monday that the move will let people watch high-definition videos, play Flash-based games and access other Web content on their Internet-connected TV sets.

Adobe says about 80 percent of all online videos run on the Flash platform. While it's been possible to watch online videos on TV sets, the company says it hasn't been "consistent." Some videos would work and some wouldn't, for example.

Adobe expects the first TVs and other devices that support the Flash platform to ship in the second half of this year.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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