Melting snow threatens spring flooding in north

March 19, 2009 By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID , AP Science Writer

(AP) -- The Red River of the North along the Minnesota-North Dakota border faces the nation's greatest threat of spring flooding, the government said in it's weather outlook Thursday.

Warnings have already been posted in the region, the only area in the 48 contiguous states listed as a high flood threat in the new national outlook.

Facing above average flood threats are:

- Much of northern Minnesota, central North Dakota and northern South Dakota.

- A region extending across northern Illinois, Indiana and Ohio and the southern two-thirds of Michigan.

- New York's Mohawk River Valley and along the northern border of Massachusetts.

The melt from heavy winter snowfalls is expected to provide the in the flood areas.

The is reported to be below average in central Wisconsin, Michigan's Upper Peninsula, the Mid-Atlantic states, Florida, Louisiana, Texas and along the Mexican border and West Coast.

The only parts of the country expected to receive unusually heavy rainfall or snow this spring are Hawaii and Alaska, the reported.

Below normal rainfall is likely in southern Florida and a region of the West including Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon, Utah, most of Washington, Montana and Colorado as well as northern California and Nevada.

The rest of the country has about even chances of wet, dry or normal .

The is for cooler than normal in Hawaii, the southern two-thirds of Alaska, Washington, Montana and the northern parts of Oregon and Idaho.

The outlook is for warmer than normal spring temperatures in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and southern Utah and Colorado.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Scientist Forecasts Above Average Mountain Moisture

Related Stories

Scientist Forecasts Above Average Mountain Moisture

November 4, 2005

The mountains of Colorado could be in for a wetter-than-average winter this season, according to Klaus Wolter, a CU-Boulder and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientist.

Snowmelt occurring earlier in N. America

March 26, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey says eastern North America is having snow melt and runoff into rivers earlier than it did in the first half of the 20th century.

El Nino could last beyond spring

December 11, 2006

A University of Colorado weather expert has warned the El Nino weather pattern over the Pacific Ocean could survive past the upcoming spring.

Lower Midwest braces for flood onslaught

June 16, 2008

Residents of the central and southern Midwest are crossing their fingers, saying their prayers, planning evacuations, and in some cases filling sandbags in preparation for the excessive water ravishing communities in Iowa ...

La Niña Anomaly Could Affect Winter Weather in Colorado

November 19, 2008

( -- A strong La Niña that developed early last winter, only to disappear this summer, is showing signs of life again and could affect our winter weather, said University of Colorado at Boulder and NOAA atmospheric ...

Recommended for you

Asteroid impact, volcanism were one-two punch for dinosaurs

October 1, 2015

Berkeley geologists have uncovered compelling evidence that an asteroid impact on Earth 66 million years ago accelerated the eruptions of volcanoes in India for hundreds of thousands of years, and that together these planet-wide ...

History shows more big wildfires likely as climate warms

October 5, 2015

The history of wildfires over the past 2,000 years in a northern Colorado mountain range indicates that large fires will continue to increase as a result of a warming climate, according to new study led by a University of ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

5 / 5 (1) Mar 20, 2009
I thought we were to believe because of global warming there was no snow?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.