Sony TVs to have electronic money function

March 2, 2009

Sony's new liquid crystal display televisions will have an electronic money function to make it easier for users to pay to watch movies and programmes, the company said Monday.

Sony's Bravia W5 and F5 series will be equipped with electronic money card readers for pay-per-viewing via an Internet link, the technology giant said.

Electronic money is already widely used in Japan, such as through credits held in mobile telephone "wallets" or on top-up commuter passes.

"With the new function of electronic money, pay-per-view programmes can be more user-friendly than before when credit card numbers were entered by pushing the keys of the remote control," a Sony spokesman said.

"People would prefer electronic money to credit cards, as the amount of one payment is usually very small," he added.

Sony expects its biggest ever loss in the year to March as the global economic downturn depresses consumer spending.

(c) 2009 AFP

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