Mania linked to desire for fame, success: study

March 2, 2009

People with manic or bipolar tendencies have higher expectations of what they can achieve in terms of success, money and fame, a new study published Monday finds.

Researchers assessed 103 people, including 27 with diagnosed manic depression, or bipolar disorder, a brain disorder that causes unusual and often dramatic shifts in a person's mood, energy and ability to function.

They were asked to fill in questionnaires designed to assess their most ambitious life goals, rating the likelihood of certain things happening to them, such as appearing regularly on TV or earning 20 million dollars or more.

"We found that the people who had experienced episodes of mania during their lives had the highest expectations of achieving popular success and financial success," said Professor Sheri L. Johnson from the University of California.

"This pattern suggests that people with manic or bipolar tendencies are drawn to focus on success, money and popular fame."

Writing in the British Journal of Clinical Psychology, she said mania -- characterised by an elevated mood, racing thoughts and increased talkativeness -- had already been linked to a belief in the importance of achievement.

"These results suggest that mania, along with all of its costs, may also drive people to set higher goals," Johnson said.

"In some cases they achieve them, giving us a glimpse into the advantages that can accompany this highly painful disorder."

(c) 2009 AFP

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KBK
2.5 / 5 (2) Mar 02, 2009
I always knew that the end run on logic of 'The American way' was that the whole thing was manic and insane. Like the rest of the world knew and knows. Since it pours out of the 'American' Psyche..as is usual for such things... they (America, overall) are unaware of it.

This is a generalization about America (and it's various citizens and folks), for sure--but there is enough truth to it to be a frightening consideration on it's own.

Does 'manic-depressive-insane-low empathy-animalistic zealot/robots' mean anything to you?

Promoting such in your culture as a way of creating and indicating 'leadership' ..well... it just shows you why America is in the pickle it is-today.
echemmeatbox
not rated yet Mar 02, 2009
KBK - I think you've missed the point of this article entirely. These people are gifted... they are naturally driven to succeed, have the energy that it takes to do so, and the higher expectations!

You're assuming (and I don't know why) that the things these gifted people choose to succeed at are negative, and I'm sure there will be some people who will choose that path - just like there are some "normal" people who would choose that path. Don't neglect to consider the people who given this potenial as well as a love for humanity or science or the arts.

Here's a list o some of these people:

http://www.nami.o...elpline1&template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=4858
Crossrip
not rated yet Mar 02, 2009
KBK, you must be from France. Please feel free to enjoy your 18 hour work week and your two room government subsidized flat. Meanwhile us Americans will be manically setting our sights higher.
echemmeatbox
not rated yet Mar 02, 2009

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