'Conduit' videogame plans to change Wii's image

March 27, 2009
Customers wait inside the Nintendo World Store in Rockefeller Center in New York City. High Voltage studio's Matt Corso says videogame lovers that think Nintendo's family-friendly Wii consoles are for seniors and little siblings are in for a big surprise in June.

High Voltage studio's Matt Corso says videogame lovers that think Nintendo's family-friendly Wii consoles are for seniors and little siblings are in for a big surprise in June.

That is when the videogame maker's "Conduit" title will hit the US market and, Corso contends, prove Wiis are ideal for action-adventure play typically associated with hardware rivals and .

"It feels like 'Halo,' but it's not," Corso said while demonstrating "Conduit" in a private room at a Game Developers Conference that ends Friday in San Francisco.

"Halo" is a blockbuster science fiction action videogame made for Microsoft's Xbox 360 consoles. Players battle alien hordes as a fierce soldier known as Master Chief.

"A lot of it is just getting over the stigma that is for grandparents and our little brother; that is complete nonsense. We were super excited about making a game for ."

"Conduit" players start as a Mr. Ford character that begins as a secret service agent investigating terrorist activity in Washington.

The character winds up battling his way through a mysterious conspiracy involving aliens.

"Mr. Ford knows a lot about special ops," Corso said as he blasted past evil extraterrestrials and enemy agents and searched for clues on an opening level of "Conduit."

"By the time you are done, he will be the Master Chief you look forward to playing in future games; he is really badass."

Game controls take advantage of motion-sensing capabilities of "Wiimote" controllers, allowing for moves such as tossing grenades with wrist flicks or rushing adversaries by jabbing.

Only the graphics capabilities of Wii consoles prevent "Conduit" action from being as visually fluid as in videogames tailored for Xbox 360 and PS3 consoles with higher technical performance and price tags, according to Corso.

Nintendo's president Satoru Iwata was among headlining speakers at GDC, where industry insiders make connections and scout for promising new videogame talent.

Iwata's presentation included an assurance that while his company's Wii consoles and DS handheld game devices have expanded the videogame market beyond "hardcore" gamers, those players will not be neglected.

"We will serve all tastes," Iwata said.

(c) 2009 AFP

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earls
not rated yet Mar 27, 2009
The Wii's gimp, childish appearance is strictly the fault of Nintendo. While their "family friendly" "high technology" disposition of the Wii has garnered Nintendo extensive success of initial sales (top selling, fast selling console); what are their residuals like? How many Xbox 360 subscriptions does it take to match the sale of a Wii or Balance Board? What is the ratio and on what timescale is it shrinking?

I am a Wii owner myself, but besides Wii Sports (only two of the five games of which are "fun"), I'm not compelled to play it, considering the majority of the games are single player only (even locally).

In addition, this article seems to be more marketing fluff than substance.

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