Alaska's Mount Redoubt spews ash 50,000 feet high

March 28, 2009
An ash cloud from the eruption of Redoubt volcano rises above the horizon in Homer, Alaska, Thursday, March 26, 2009. The eruption Thursday morning sent an ash cloud 65,000 feet above sea level, the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported. (AP Photo/Kenai Peninsula Clarion, McKibben Jackinsky)

(AP) -- Alaska's Mount Redoubt has erupted again, spewing an ash cloud 50,000 feet up into the air.

The Observatory in Anchorage says the volcano had a significant eruption at 1:20 a.m. Saturday. The ash is expected to move north toward the Alaska Range, missing Anchorage which is about 100 miles from the volcano.

The observatory says after the eruption, it detected strong lasting 20 minutes or more followed by an hours-long low-level tremor.

Since the series of eruptions began Sunday night, the volcano has had about a dozen bursts. The last time the volcano erupted was during a four-month period in 1989-90.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Alaskan volcano sends ash plume high

Related Stories

Alaska volcano eruptions ground flights

January 31, 2006

Alaska Airlines has canceled all flights to and from Anchorage because of activity at the Augustine volcano, about 180 miles southwest of Anchorage.

Alaska volcano Mount Redoubt erupts 5 times

March 23, 2009

(AP) -- Alaska's Mount Redoubt volcano erupted five times overnight, sending an ash plume more than 9 miles into the air in the volcano's first emissions in nearly 20 years.

Recommended for you

New study sheds light on end of Snowball Earth period

August 24, 2015

The second ice age during the Cryogenian period was not followed by the sudden and chaotic melting-back of the ice as previously thought, but ended with regular advances and retreats of the ice, according to research published ...

Earth's mineralogy unique in the cosmos

August 26, 2015

New research from a team led by Carnegie's Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.