Women who consume olive oil preserve their bone mass better

Feb 18, 2009

A study from the Harokopio University of Athens (Greece) determines that adherence to a dietary pattern close to the Mediterranean diet, with high consumption of fish and olive oil and low red meat intake, has a significant impact in women skeletal health.

Results suggest that this eating pattern could have bone-preserving properties throughout adult life.

Diet is one of the modifiable factors for the development and maintenance of bone mass. The nutrients of most obvious relevance to bone health are calcium and phosphorus because they compose roughly 80% to 90% of the mineral content of bone; protein, other minerals and vitamins are also essential in bone preservation.

Traditional analysis has focused on the relation between a specific nutrient (e.g. calcium) and bone health. But, researchers of the Harokopio University of Athens, Greece, carried out a study in two hundred twenty adult Greek women, which is valuable for the understanding of the effect of meals, consisting of several food items, in skeletal mass.

Scientists examined whether adherence to the Mediterranean Diet, rich in plant foods and olive oil, low in meat and dairy products, and with moderate intake of alcohol, or other dietary patterns, have any significant impact on bone mass maintenance in adult Greek women. They determined that adherence to a dietary pattern with some of the features of the Mediterranean diet, i.e., rich in fish and olive oil and low in red meat and products, is positively associated with the indices of bone mass.

These results suggest -Oleociencia News inform- that this eating pattern could have bone-preserving properties throughout adult life.

This paper has been published in 2009 in Nutrition magazine; and has been written by Meropi D. Kontogianni, Labros Melistas, Mary Yannakoulia, Ioannis Malagaris, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, and Nikos Yiannakouris of the Harokopio University of Athens, Greece.

More information: Association between dietary patterns and indices of bone mass in a sample of Mediterranean women- Nutrition 25 (2009) 165-171

Provided by GDESCO, Spain

Explore further: Tobacco firms get partial win over claims on smoking effects (Update)

Related Stories

New Japan volcano island 'natural lab' for life

5 hours ago

A brand new island emerging off the coast of Japan offers scientists a rare opportunity to study how life begins to colonise barren land—helped by rotting bird poo and hatchling vomit.

Recommended for you

Breastfeeding protects against environmental pollution

May 22, 2015

Living in a city with a high level of vehicle traffic or close to a steel works means living with two intense sources of environmental pollution. However, a study conducted by the UPV/EHU researcher Aitana ...

When it comes to hearing, diet may trump noise exposure

May 22, 2015

Although the old wives' tale about carrots being good for your eyesight has been debunked, University of Florida researchers have found a link between healthy eating and another of your five senses: hearing.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.