Toshiba signs agreement for 2 nuclear plants in Texas

February 25, 2009 Kyodo News International

Toshiba Corp. said Wednesday it has signed an engineering, procurement and construction agreement for two new nuclear plants to be built under the U.S. South Texas Project.

The signing came after Toshiba was named prime contractor in March last year for engineering and procurement of major equipment for the plants, which would be the first two 1,400-megawatt advanced boiling water reactors in the United States.

Under the agreement with STP Nuclear Operating Co., one of the two new reactors is planned to start operation in 2016 and the other in 2017. The project covers two existing nuclear power plants in addition to the planned ABWRs.

STP Nuclear Operating is responsible for management of the overall project, acting as agent for Nuclear Innovation North America LLC, an ABWR development joint venture between Toshiba and NRG Energy Inc. of the United States, and for CPS Energy, the largest U.S. municipal electric and gas utility.

(c) 2009 MCT

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