New rat species found on Philippines mountain

Feb 18, 2009
Handout picture from the Chicago-based Field Museum of Natural History shows the Hamiguitan batomys, or hairy-tailed rat. Weighing about 175 grams (6.2 ounces), the new species of rodent was found 950 metres above sea level in the dwarf mossy forests of Mount Hamiguitan on Mindanao island, southern Philippines.

A new species of rat has been found on a mountain in the southern Philippines, the environment department said on Wednesday.



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Modernmystic
1 / 5 (2) Feb 18, 2009
Thank God it was found in the Philippines, otherwise you could probably kiss several thousand more jobs here in the US goodbye.

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